201801
Scaling up
Chasing a white elephant within the inclusive business debate

GRAPHIC SUMMARY

A visual summary of the key challenges entrepreneurs need to consider when it comes to reaching scale. Learn more about these aspects by reading this edition of the online magazine on inclusive business! The illustration was developed by Christopher Malapitan, a visual practitioner and trainer based in Brussels. Through the use of visual storytelling methods he empowers individuals and organizations to “see” what they mean.

editorial

Thoughts on Scale

When I was asked to write an introduction to this Theme, I thought initially to write about my personal experience as co-founder of Hilltribe Organics on the challenges of scaling up as a soci

Markus Dietrich

Table of contents

graphic summary

GRAPHIC SUMMARY

A visual summary of the key challenges entrepreneurs need to consider when it comes to reaching scale. Learn more about these aspects by reading this edition of the online magazine on inclusive business! The illustration was developed by Christopher…

editorial

Thoughts on Scale

When I was asked to write an introduction to this Theme, I thought initially to write about my personal experience as co-founder of Hilltribe Organics on the challenges of scaling up as a soci

Markus Dietrich

featured story

To scale your business in a sustainable manner, don’t try to be what you are not in order to appease other people outside of your business

'We are superb at failing but also at learning from our failures', says Will Coetsee, Managing Director of Botanica Natural Products. The company is an award-winning, family-owned social enterprise located in rural Limpopo, South Africa. Since 2009, the company strives to integrate the use of indigenous plants, traditional knowledge and science to promote better skin health. Learn more about their lessons learned regarding the scaling of their business model.

Susann Tischendorf

Does Scale Matter?

Julian Peach, Director of Knowledge at Grow Asia summarises the findings of a report by BEAM Exchange and Adam Smith. Their findings confirm that all scaling efforts will be in vain, if there is no supportive ecosystem. This piece also provides six very useful tips on how entrepreneurs can overcome internal barriers when they are scaling their business models: how long it takes, the likelihood of scale, and which route to use.

Scaling inclusive business: Something that not just concerns the entrepreneur, but everyone

We talked to Marcos Athias Neto, the Director of the Istanbul International Center for Private Sector in Development of the United nations Development Programme (UNDP) how to tackle the most difficult challenge of reaching scale. His diagnosis: inclusive business in general has scaled more slowly than he expected ten years ago. He also flags four key ingredients that the market system needs to provide in order for more inclusive businesses to reach scale.

Always have a plan A, B and C

Instead of talking about barriers, Nigerian entrepreneur Ndidi Nwuneli tells us three success factors that made it possible for her company AACE Foods to reach scale. Sharing some lessons learned from failing, she also has a very good advice for entrepreneurs: Always have a plan A, B and C.

The Do’s and Don'ts of scaling in West Africa: Ignitia’s story

Ignitia is a company that provides hyper-local weather forecasts to hundreds of thousands of farmers in West Africa, via SMS, based on GPS location. When we asked them for scaling barriers they did not name the usual suspects (information, finance, rules and capacity), but four other barriers that are at least equally important.

Being passionate about improving the lives of the very poor and firmly believing that private companies can be change agents is what is most crucial to scaling an inclusive business.

The success of Jain Irrigation is a result of the support the company provides to farmers so that they can solve their own problems in a comprehensive and not isolated way.

An entrepreneur's journey of growing a waste and recycling business in Ghana

Jürgen Meinel is the founder of Ghana's first recycling company. In this interview, he talks about the challenges of being a ‘competitor’ to the informal waste sector. He outlines his efforts to roll out recycling centers all over the country.