Publication database

This database contains a diverse range of more than 2,000 publications about inclusive business and relating topics, such as impact investing, microfinance and market systems approaches. You will find not only reports but also market intelligence, case studies, tools and videos that touch upon of several sectors and regions.

The diverse range of publications in this database all relate to inclusive business - meaning business models that engage base of the pyramid (BoP) consumers, suppliers, entrepreneurs and/or employees in low income and/or emerging markets.

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Database: Publications

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7
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Smallholder Farmer Support Analysis Part 1: Analysis of commercial value chain integration models
31

Commissioned by the Netherlands Enterprise Agency, this report presents an analysis of four smallholder support programmes in South Africa.

PublisherNetherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO)
Publish Date
AuthorW. Chamberlain
LanguageEnglish
Region/CountrySub-Saharan Africa
South Africa
SectorAgriculture or Food
No
Inclusive Business as Employment Generator in Rural Settlements
54

The aim of this report is to identify how commercial businesses can generate employment opportunities in rural areas through inclusive business models.

PublisherTrade & Industrial Policy Strategies (TIPS)
Publish Date
AuthorW. Chamberlain
LanguageEnglish
Region/CountrySub-Saharan Africa
South Africa
SectorAgriculture or Food, Retail, Manufacturing or Consumer Goods
No
Smallholder Farmer Support Analysis Part 2: Theory of Change -Businessmodel design for smallholder farmer support
50

Commissioned by the Netherlands Enterprise Agency, this report presents a practically oriented Theory of Change to develop business models for successful and sustainable smallholder integration into commercial value chains.

PublisherNetherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO)
Publish Date
AuthorW. Chamberlain
LanguageEnglish
Region/CountrySub-Saharan Africa
South Africa
SectorAgriculture or Food
No
Inclusive Businesses and Land Reform: Corporatization or Transformation?
18

Inclusive businesses (IBs), embodying partnerships between commercial agribusinesses and smallholder farmers/low-income communities, are considered to contribute towards rural development and agricultural sector transformation. Structured as complex organizational setups consisting of, and overcoming the limitations of, standard inclusive instruments (collective organization, mentorship, supply contract, lease/management contract and equity), they allow for the inclusion of smallholders and low-income communities into commercial agricultural value chains. IBs are a way for governments to engage private agribusinesses in agricultural and rural policies. However, will the commercial sector, through IB partnerships, contribute towards the government's transformation and developmental objectives? Based on case studies in South Africa-a country engaged in land and agrarian reforms-the effects of IBs at the project level appear positive, illustrated by an increase in production and growth in agricultural assets. However, individual beneficiaries experience only a marginal change in income and livelihoods. Whereas land reform, project development and market integration are generally achieved, the transformation and beneficiary development objectives are compromised. Although commercial agribusinesses contribute to investment needs in the sector and smallholder exposure to commercial markets, IB partnerships allow commercial entities control over the smallholders' assets. Ownership and secure rights, especially of land, and support of external parties to capacitate beneficiaries and adjust power asymmetries, are essential starting points. Without these aspects, IBs will not lead to effective transformation and development.

PublisherLand
Publish Date
AuthorW. Anseeuw, W. Chamberlain
LanguageEnglish
Region/CountrySub-Saharan Africa
South Africa
SectorAgriculture or Food
No
Contract Farming as Part of a Multi-Instrument Inclusive Business Structure: A Theoretical Analysis
15

Contract farming (CF) agreements are presently being restructured to form part of more complex Inclusive Business (IB) set-ups. Additional instruments, alongside CF, are implemented to overcome the challenges of CF and to adapt to the policy environment in which the different stakeholders operate. This paper develops a theoretical framework that gives insight into how these complex entities are structured and operate in a developing country context. This theoretical analysis takes a holistic approach by adopting elements of existing theories to form a new critical research paradigm: (i) Resource Dependence Theory to incorporate the wider operating environment in which the two cases operate, (ii) Transaction Cost Economics to explain the internal efficiency of the different models, and (iii) Agency Theory to account for the safeguard mechanisms. This new framework is then tested on two complex IBs that aim to integrate smallholder farmers into the commercial value chain, but which have each implemented a different institutional set-up developed around CF arrangements. It finds that a high dependence by the offtaker in the first case study stimulates a higher level of commitment and investment by this stakeholder in the contract arrangement. In turn, this increases the asset specificity aspect, which then requires safeguards to ensure the smallholders adhere to the contractual agreement. A higher dependency in this particular study also resulted in a higher number of smallholders being engaged in the contract, requiring mechanisms to efficiently monitor and coordinate them.

PublisherAgrekon
Publish Date
AuthorW. Anseeuw, W. Chamberlain
LanguageEnglish
Region/CountryGlobal, Sub-Saharan Africa
South Africa
SectorAgriculture or Food
No
Inclusive Businesses in Agriculture
282

Inclusive business is hailed as a win-win scenario for the development of smallholder farmers and poor communities; yet there is little insight into how these inclusive businesses work and, more importantly, for whom. This book aims for a thorough understanding of the range of inclusive businesses in agriculture by examining: the structures they implement, the actors involved, and whether they are effectively inclusive of smallholders. It presents a range of case studies and is therefore empirically based and practically oriented. By offering a critical assessment of inclusive businesses overall, it allows for a better perception of what works where, and under which conditions. It provides useful insights that will benefit smallholders, agri-businesses, support groups, policy makers and investors who are willing to promote more inclusive businesses, that foster a better integration of smallholders into commercial value-chains and a more equitable and sustainable agricultural sector.

PublisherSUN PRESS
Publish Date
AuthorW. Anseeuw, W. Chamberlain
LanguageEnglish
Region/CountrySub-Saharan Africa
SectorAgriculture or Food
No
Enabling Policy for Inclusive Agribusiness
5

This paper is part of a series of papers on inclusive agribusiness written for the “Towards a Global Research and Learning Agenda for Inclusive Agribusiness” workshop in March 2017. This issue focuses on understanding and influencing enabling policies for Inclusive agribusiness (IAB). Despite the large number of IAB initiatives, little has been done in terms of meta-analysis regarding enabling and constraining policy factors and cross country comparison. A key issue is not just the policy settings, but also the processes and platforms by which business, policy and other actors engage to transparently work on improved enabling conditions. A knowledge and learning agenda would consequently need to look at both substantive policy issues and processes.

PublisherGlobal Donor Platform for Rural Development, Seas of Change, BEAM Exchange, Food & Business Knowledge Platform
Publish Date
AuthorJ. Woodhill
LanguageEnglish
Region/CountrySub-Saharan Africa
SectorAgriculture or Food
No